Search results for COMB & RAZOR SOUND

Various – Calabar-Itu Road: Groovy Sounds (1972-82)
Friday, December 16th, 2016 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on Various – Calabar-Itu Road: Groovy Sounds (1972-82)

Image: 1607818 Wenn die meisten Leute an nigerianische Musik denken, ist das Erste, was ihnen in den Sinn kommt, Lagos, das kommerzielle Zentrum, die glitzernde Megacity, die Yoruba-sprechende Musik-Koryphäen wie Fela Kuti, Sir Shina Peters, Wizkidoder oder King Sunny Ade hervorgebracht hat. Aber Nigeria zeichnet sich durch seine Vielfalt aus, die von Igbo Highlife und den Rockbands der Ost-Zentralregion zu den Roots-Rhythmen aus dem Mittelwesten zu den Fulani Melodien des Nordens reicht. Aber eine Region, die bisher weitgehend unerforscht geblieben ist, ist der südöstliche Teil des Landes. Die Region wird umgangssprachlich als “Calabar” bezeichnet und war eine der frühesten Vorposten der nigerianischen Volksmusik. Seine ursprünglichen Rhythmen reisten während des Sklavenhandels über den Atlantik und stifteten über Afro-Cubanische Grooves einen Beitrag zur Entwicklung von Jazz, Rock & Roll, R&B und Funk. Comb & Razor Sound präsentiert nun eine Sammlung mit 15 raren Songs aus den Jahren 1972 bis 1982 von Musikern aus der Calabar Region. Die CD erscheint mit umfangreichen Informationen, seltenen Fotos und Illustrationen. Available from 20.01.2017

Various – Calabar-Itu Road: Groovy Sounds (1972-82)
Thursday, November 3rd, 2016 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on Various – Calabar-Itu Road: Groovy Sounds (1972-82)

Image: 1606748 “When most people think about Nigerian music, the first thing that comes to mind is Lagos—the country’s main commercial center,
the glittering megacity that spawned Yoruba-speaking music luminaries such as Fela Kuti, King Sunny Ade, Sir Shina Peters and
Wizkid. But Nigeria is a country of rich diversity, especially in its music: From the Igbo highlife and rock bands of east-central
region, to the deep Edo roots rhythms from the midwest, to the keening, ornamented Fulani melodies of the north.
But one region whose music has remained largely underexplored is the south eastern land of the Efik and Ibibio ethnic groups in
Cross River and Akwa Ibom State—the region colloquially referred to as “Calabar.” A cradle of culture, this region was one of the
earliest outposts of Nigerian popular music. Its primordial rhythms traveled across the Atlantic during the slave trade to provide the
part of the foundation for Afro-Cuban grooves that would go on to influence the development of jazz, rock & roll, R&B and funk.
With the new Calabar-Itu Road compilation, Comb & Razor Sound presents15 heavy tracks recorded in the decade between 1972
and 1982, spotlighting rare music from “Calabar” superstars such as Etubom Rex Williams, Cross River Nationale, Charles “Effi”
Duke, The Doves and Mary Afi Usuah. The package features a magazine-style booklet containing a wealth of information about the
milieu with rare photographs and illustrations.
The Calabar-Itu Road is the major artery linking modern-day Cross River and Akwa Ibom States. And Calabar-Itu Road: Groovy
Sounds from South Eastern Nigeria (1972-1982) will link the region’s music to the rest of the world!”

A1. Isadico Dance Band – Mbre Isong (Intro)
A2. Cross River Nationale – Nyong Eyen Unen
A3. The Visitors – Eyen Erong Nwa
A4. Mansion – Akam Itoro Abasi
B1. Monica Isaac – Akananwan Isong Idung
B2. Emmanual Ntia – Top Eyop Odo
B3. The Sea Lions – Akwa Idim
B4. Charles Duke – Suk Usan Idang (Interlude)
C1. Isadico Dance Band – Eti Eyenekla
C2. The Doves – Akan Anwan Isong Idung
C3. Mari Afi Usuah & The South Eastern State Cultural Band – Mma Ama Mbo
C4. Sunny Risky & The Vitamin Explosion – Atak Mfat Eyen
D1. Chief Inyang Henshaw & His Top Ten Aces – Eseme Ikpong
D2. Etubom Rex Williams & His Nigerian Artistes – Ererimbot Afayung Oko
D3. Bustic Kingsley Bassey’s Anansa Engineers – Journey To Luna Available from 25.11.2016

Rock Town Express – Funky Makossa
Saturday, July 22nd, 2017 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on Rock Town Express – Funky Makossa

Image: 1611068 In 1973, EMI Records Nigeria released the 45 rpm disc “Fuel for Love” b/w “Soundway,” credited to a mysterious band
called Wrinkar Experience. The record was a finely-crafted gem of pop-rock and funky soul as had never before been heard
coming out of the country’s nascent rock scene, and it ended up being the biggest selling Nigerian single up until that
point. The success of Wrinkar Experience effectively demonstrated that was a market for homegrown pop and rock, and
sent record labels scrambling to sign similar bands, kicking off the Nigerian rock revolution that is still being celebrated
and discovered by new generations today.
But while Wrinkar Experience launched the movement, the group itself would be short-lived: after another hit single in
1973, the band’s frontman Danie Ian split for a solo career. The remaining principal players in the group—Cameroonian
musicians Ginger Forcha and Edjo’o Jacques Racine—tried to keep the Wrinkar name going before giving it up and
rebranding themselves as Rock Town Express.
Rock Town Express’s debut LP Funky Makossa was recorded in 1974 for ARC Records, the cutting-edge studio and label
established in Lagos by English drum legend Ginger Baker. The album showcased in long format the qualities that had only
been hinted at on the Wrinkar Experience singles: bright, confident pop melodies, articulate lyrics, and darkly
potent funk-rock.
Comb & Razor Sound is proud to present a new, fully-authorized reissue of Funky Makossa, featuring the seven tracks
from the original release, plus “I Am A Natural Man” and “I Don’t Want To Know,” from Wrinkar Experience’s seldom-heard
third and final single.

Tracklisting (updated)
1. Funky Makossa
2. Tell Me My Life
3. Dear Doctor
4. No One Else (But Me)
5. We’re Makin’ A Hell
6. If You Love Your Neighbour You No Go Die
7. Sweet Rock Town Available from 29.09.2017

Foundars 15 – Fire Woman
Wednesday, July 12th, 2017 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on Foundars 15 – Fire Woman

Image: 1610870 The 1970s in Nigeria were an age when mighty bands walked the earth. In Lagos, afro-rock stalwarts such as BLO
and Monomono ruled the roost, eastwards, it was deeply funky groups like The Funkees, The Apostles and The
Friimen. Up north you had soulful ensembles such as The Elcados and The Moonrakers. And in the southeast, you
had Foundars 15.
Foundars 15 were not the only rock band operating in the southern city of Port Harcourt, but they were without
question the tightest and most eclectic not just in Port Harcourt but perhaps in Nigeria as a whole. Formed initially
as an army band in the wake of the Nigerian civil war of 1967-1970, Foundars 15 released a string of singles in
the early seventies, followed by four albums of heavy, jittery funk-rock between 1976 and 1978 before splitting up
to pursue solo careers.
1977’s Fire Woman is perhaps the finest (and rarest) of Foundars 15’s albums, offering a spicy buffet of groovy
pop, reggae, native rock and dense, off-kilter funk. Long sought after by aficionados, Fire Woman has been an LP
that is more often heard about than actually heard.
That is about to change.
Comb & Razor Sound is proud to present a new, fully-authorized reissue of Fire Woman, featuring eight crucial
cuts representing the gold standard of the golden age of Nigerian pop music. Here’s your chance to catch the fire!

A1. Fire Woman
A2. The Truth (Shall Save Us)
A3. True Light
A4. You’re The One
B1. Take Me Home
B2. Simin Boogie
B3. Don’t Take Me For A Ride
B4. Ekele Available from 25.08.2017

Shango Dance Band
Monday, July 25th, 2016 | Tags: , ,
Posted in Features, Magazine | Comments Off on Shango Dance Band

It’s 1968 and Fela is in tears. Fela Kuti, the genius of afrobeat. The champion of the people. Fabled for unflinchingly staring down the barrels of state tyranny, enduring beatings within an inch of his life from government stormtroopers and then getting on stage to mock his tormenters in song. Fela the fearless, Fela the […]

A legendary, ultra-rare Afrobeat killer, restored and presented for the first time in wide release
Friday, July 22nd, 2016 | Tags: , ,
Posted in Magazine, News | Comments Off on A legendary, ultra-rare Afrobeat killer, restored and presented for the first time in wide release

It’s 1968 and Fela is in tears. Fela Kuti, the genius of afrobeat. The champion of the people. Fabled for unflinchingly staring down the barrels of state tyranny, enduring beatings within an inch of his life from government stormtroopers and then getting on stage to mock his tormenters in song. Fela the fearless, Fela the […]

Semi Colon – Ndia Egbuo Ndia (Afro-Jigida)
Wednesday, November 13th, 2013 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on Semi Colon – Ndia Egbuo Ndia (Afro-Jigida)

Image: 1585232 Das lang verschollene Afro-Funk/Rock Meisterwerk aus dem Jahr 1976 von Semi Colon aus Nigeria wird als Deluxe-Doppel-CD im 6×9″ Format inklusive eines 72-seitigen Buches mit raren Fotos, Bonus Tracks und unveröffentlichten Demos auf dem Comb & Razor Sound Label wiederveröffentlicht. Das Album folgt der vorzüglichen “Brand New Wayo” Compilation und wurde wieder vom Afro-Musik-Fachmann und Labelinhaber Uchenna Ikonne kenntnisreich zusammengestellt und detailliert annotiert. Ein Muss für jeden Fan von Soundway, Analog Afrika und Strut Veröffentlichungen des Genres. Available from 25.10.2013

Shango Dance Band – Shango Dance Band
Tuesday, March 21st, 2017 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on Shango Dance Band – Shango Dance Band

Image: 1609388 A LEGENDARY, ULTRA-RARE PRIVATE AFROBEAT KILLER, RESTORED AND PRESENTED FOR THE FIRST TIME IN WIDE RELEASE! Now without 7″ and at lower price!

TRACKLIST:
A1. Position Pass Power
B1. Women Are Great
B2. I Need Your Love

In the early years of Fela Kuti’s career, well before he would define the genre of afrobeat, and leave an indelible mark on the musical landscape, he was a struggling trumpet player, seeking to redefine the sound of his current group, the art-jazz ensemble Fela Ransome-Kuti Quintet. As he moved his group towards the thenpopular genre of highlife in 1963, he lost his bassist in the move towards commercial success, but gained the company of Ojo Okeji, who had a sterling reputation both as a bassist and percussionist in groups like Lagos Cool Cats, Rex Williams’ Nigerian Artistes, and Western Toppers Highlife Band, a favorite of Kuti’s. Okeji impressed Kuti with his deft jazziness on the bass, so he was in on the spot, and the Fela Ransome-Kuti Quintet became Koola Lobitos It was Okeji that introduced Kuti to the famed percussionist Tony Allen, (Who would subsequently join Kuti into his greatest years as an artist) as well as conguero Abayomi “Easy” Adio. During his time in Koola Lobitos, Okeji not only contributed deeply melodic, and adeptly rhythmic baselines, but brought his own influence from emerging US soul artists like James Brown & The Famous Flames and Wilson Pickett, heavily pushing Koola Lobitos towards a more soulful direction. This push was often resisted by Kuti, who frequently clashed with Okeji, who formed the group VC 7 as a side-project for that purpose. 1968 proved to be a turning point for the group, as the Nigerian Civil War broke out, and many starving musicians turned to the military for work. Okeji and Adio would leave for the army, while Kuti and Allen kept Koola Lobitos going, where it evolved through different names and iterations and grew into the worldwide afrobeat force that made Kuti an icon during the 70s and 80s. But as Kuti and Allen rose to global recognition, Okeji and Adio would form a new band within the ranks of the 6th Infantry Brigade of the Nigerian Army. Their emblazoned blue jackets earned them the nickname “The Blues”, but Okeji preferred the name Shango,after the Yoruba thunder god.
Shango took the fundamentals of Kuti’s famous afrobeat and brought new layers of guitar and horn arrangements, while often invoking supernatural aesthetics, and maintaining a love for the US soul artists that influenced Okeji so much. Because Shango was an army band however, their records were not readily available to anyone outside of the military so their music, including their eponymous 1974 LP, remained relatively unknown even amongst the people of Nigeria.So many decades later however, Comb & Razor presents it for the first time to a mass audience on vinyl.

It’s 1968 and Fela is in tears.
Fela Kuti, the genius of afrobeat. The champion of the people. Fabled for unflinchingly staring down the barrels of
state tyranny, enduring beatings within an inch of his life from government stormtroopers and then getting on stage
to mock his tormenters in song. Fela the fearless, Fela the invincible. Fela who they call Anikulapo—“he who carries
death in his pocket.” What insurmountable catastrophe could have reduced this formidable titan of African music
to tears?
Ojo Okeji leaving his band, that’s what.
– From the liner notes, by renowned musicologist Uchenna Ikonne Available from 14.04.2017

SJOB Movement – Friendship Train
Tuesday, February 7th, 2017 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on SJOB Movement – Friendship Train

Image: 1608613 SJOB Movements “Friendship Train” war das zweite Album der Afrobeat Band aus Nigeria aus dem Jahr 1976. Das Album erscheint nun mit Bonustracks auf dem exquisiten Bostoner Cultures Of Soul Label mit Hilfe des renommierten Musikhistorikers Uchenna Ikonne, der schon auf Soundway, Now Again und seinem eigenen Comb & Razor Label hochwertige Reissues veröffentlichte und auch hier wieder mit seinen umfassenden Liner Notes für den nötigen Kontext sorgt. Available from 17.03.2017

Shango Dance Band – Shango Dance Band
Tuesday, July 12th, 2016 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on Shango Dance Band – Shango Dance Band

Image: 1605109 A Legendary, Ultra-Rare Afrobeat Killer, Restored And Presented For The First Time In Wide Release! / Lp Includes Bonus 7” Disc Featuring The Rare 1972 Single “Son Of Thunder” B/w “Alupandu-Gbe” / Limited To 1000 Copies /

It’s 1968 and Fela is in tears. Fela Kuti, the genius of afrobeat. The champion of the people. Fabled for unflinchingly staring down the barrels of state tyranny, enduring beatings within an inch of his life from government stormtroopers and then getting on stage to mock his tormenters in song. Fela the fearless, Fela the invincible. Fela who they call Anikulapo—“he who carries death in his pocket.” What insurmountable catastrophe could have reduced this formidable titan of African music to tears? Ojo Okeji leaving his band, that’s what.
– From the liner notes, by renowned Nigerian music historian Uchenna Ikonne

In the early years of Fela Kuti’s career, well before he would define the genre of afrobeat, and leave an indelible mark on the musical landscape, he was a struggling trumpet player, seeking to redefine the sound of his current group, the art-jazz ensemble Fela Ransome-Kuti Quintet. As he moved his group towards the then-popular genre of highlife in 1963, he lost his bassist in the move towards commercial success, but gained the company of Ojo Okeji, who had a sterling reputation both as a bassist and percussionist in groups like Lagos Cool Cats, Rex Williams’ Nigerian Artistes, and Western Toppers Highlife Band, a favorite of Kuti’s. Okeji impressed Kuti with his deft jazziness on the bass, so he was in on the spot, and the Fela Ransome-Kuti Quintet became Koola Lobitos.
It was Okeji that introduced Kuti to the famed percussionist Tony Allen, (Who would subsequently join Kuti into his greatest years as an artist) as well as conguero Abayomi “Easy” Adio. During his time in Koola Lobitos, Okeji not only contributed deeply melodic, and adeptly rhythmic baselines, but brought his own influence from emerging US soul artists like James Brown & The Famous Flames and Wilson Pickett, heavily pushing Koola Lobitos towards a more soulful direction. This push was often resisted by Kuti, who frequently clashed with Okeji.
1968 proved to be a turning point for the group, as the Nigerian Civil War broke out, and many starving musicians turned to the military for work. Okeji and Adio would leave for the army, while Kuti and Allen kept Koola Lobitos going, where it evolved through different names and iterations and grew into the worldwide afrobeat force that made Kuti an icon during the 70s and 80s. But as Kuti and Allen rose to global recognition, Okeji and Adio would form a new band within the ranks of the 6th Infantry Brigade of the Nigerian Army. Their emblazoned blue jackets earned them the nickname “The Blues”, but Okeji preferred the name “Shango” after the Yoruba thunder god. Shango took the fundamentals of Kuti’s famous afrobeat and brought new layers of guitar and horn arrangements, while often invoking supernatural aesthetics, and maintaining a love for the US soul artists that influenced Okeji so much. Because Shango was an army band however, their records were not readily available to anyone outside of the military so their music, including their eponymous 1974 LP, remained relatively unknown even amongst the people of Nigeria. Decades later Comb & Razor is thrilled to present this long-lost Nigerian gem for the first time to a world-wide audience.

LP TRACKLIST
A1. Position Pass Power
B1. Women Are Great
B2. I Need Your Love

BONUS 7” (ONLY W/ FIRST 1000 COPIES)
A1. Son Of Thunder
B1. Alupandu-Gbe Available from 09.09.2016

The Eric Grant Orchestra – Cool At The Casa Montego
Friday, November 14th, 2014 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on The Eric Grant Orchestra – Cool At The Casa Montego

Image: 1592343 A masterpiece of Jamaican Jazz recorded in 1960 by the Eric Grant Orchestra, resident band of the Casa Montego Hotel in Montego Bay, Jamaica. Rhythm & Blues, Jazz standards, Cha Cha Cha, Merengue and Calypso all combine in this wonderful amalgamation of sounds. Produced by the first Jamaican studio, Federal Records, and its founder Ken Khouri, it is now re-issued for the first time ever by Dub Store Records.

Available on LP and CD formats. CD comes as a Japanese mini-LP format with obi-strip.

Recorded at Federal Studio.

Musicians: Vocal: Hugh Miller, Piano: Eric Grant, Sax: Barrington Saddler, [merry Hop] Drums: Charles Campbell, Bass: David Brevett, Guitar: Harlod Mckenzie, Trumpet: Canute Carr.

Track Listing

1. Uncle Joe
2. Mr. Wonderful
3. Razor Merengue
4. Misty
5. Mother And Wife
6. Let’s Fall In Love
7. Cha Cha International
8. Anema De Core
9. T’is Wonderful
10. Take Her To Jamaica
11. Mind Your Own Business
12. I Want To Be Happy Available from 27.05.2016

C.S. Crew – Funky Pack
Thursday, May 9th, 2013 | Posted in Products | Comments Off on C.S. Crew – Funky Pack

Image: 1580051 Das Album “Funky Pack” der Band C.S. Crew kann als eine nigerianschie Mischung aus Kool & The Gang, Mandrill und Ohio Players mit einer Portion Moog Synthesizer beschrieben werden. Dieses rohe Funk Meisterwerk aus den späten Siebzigern wird nun erstmalig wiederveröffentlicht und erscheint mit Bonus Tracks der nahestehenden Band Youths Of The Universe und Liner Notes des Comb And Razor Inhabers und szenebekannten Plattensammlers Uchenna Ikonne, der auch vielfach für Soundway arbeitete. Ein Muss für Fans von Analog Africa, Soundway, Strut und Now Again Wiederveröffentlichungen! Available from 19.04.2013

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